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MSc Media and Communication

The international Master’s programme in media and communication attracts over four hundred applications for around thirty places every year. Our 2015-2017 cohort has students from all over the world, including Europe, the Baltic regions, Australia, Indonesia, North America, Central America, China, and Africa. One of our Swedish students commented on the programme: ‘a great learning experience! Students from all over the world in the same classroom guaranteed many new and interesting perspectives.’

When thinking about applying for this programme, please consider going beyond the minimum requirements (see the Lund University web portal). We are looking for students who excel in the specific eligibility requirements; we select applicants on the basis of their previous study results (grades on courses and thesis in the Bachelor’s degree), proficiency in English and statement of purpose.

There are three kinds of applicant profiles for this international programme. We attract applications from graduates who are eager to develop their critical thinking skills and explore the role of media, communication, culture and society while experiencing the Swedish model of learning at a top ranking University. These graduates are looking for the specific type of media and communication programme we offer which focuses on media structures and processes in modern life. Our courses are taught be world experts, on topics such as media and political engagement, or media and morality, and students in our programme participate in a vibrant research led department.

Here are two postgraduate students, from Colombia and Turkey, reflecting on the research led courses taught within the department:

The course tackles the key point of debate amongst democratic societies nowadays – are interactions, new knowledge, and media consumption trends really meaningful for the development of democracy? The acknowledgment of the power struggles implicit in media environments frame the discussions and research outcomes of this very interesting course.

The structure follows the Nordic model of teaching and learning that requires a lot of self study and group projects. I liked this model since it makes the students more active instead of passive listeners in the lectures. Especially the nature of the lectures where we do presentations and group projects, creates a better learning environment for students to engage with the topics which makes it very interesting and demanding. It requires a lot of work, however, in the end, you get so much out of it.

Another kind of application relates to people who want to continue their research education beyond a Masters, for example undertaking a doctorate, or becoming a full time research assistant on a funded project. Here is another postgraduate student commenting on their experience of the programme:

The most vivid memory I will have is feeling that I matter, that I am not just a student, that I have the ability to improve myself in every lecture, develop critical thoughts and that the Professor is genuinely interested in those thoughts. That is what being a researcher feels like, that is what being a Lund University student feels like. 

A third kind of applicant includes people working in the media and cultural industries, NGOs and charity sectors, who wish to deepen their already extensive professional knowledge during a two year programme. These professional journalists, from China and Bosnia and Herzegovina, explained:

 The most valued experience of the course is that it expanded my horizon of media knowledge. As a skilled editor and journalist who came from China, I appreciated the opportunity to think about the media in different ways.

As a journalist, I am very satisfied because now I have the right theories and the tools that I can use to further analyse not only various media products, but also how media demonstrates some aspects of different groups and individuals in society.

For further student testimonials from current courses on the programme, see the website.

One recent example of the participatory learning experience of the programme can be seen in the project on the refugee crisis, where fifteen students from the Media and Participation course shared their stories of this humanitarian crisis.